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Don’t force feed critical race theory to children | READER COMMENTARY

Republican teacher "Now you know what to do if a critical race theorist shows up." July 12, 2021. (Bill Bramhall/Tribune Content Agency).
Republican teacher "Now you know what to do if a critical race theorist shows up." July 12, 2021. (Bill Bramhall/Tribune Content Agency). (Bill Bramhall/New York Daily News)

I read Leonard Pitts Jr.’s recent commentary regarding critical race theory and would like to express my own opinion (”Leonard Pitts Jr.: Critical race theory is this year’s ‘War on Christmas,’” July 12).

As the author stated, critical race theory studies have been taught for the better part of 30 years, mostly in law schools to elucidate how racial bias can affect legal outcomes based on race and ethnicity. This has been a serious and critical evaluation to “level the playing field” in legal matters.

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That being said, however, his comparison to “this being the next ‘War on Christmas’” seems a bit myopic. The issue is not the study of critical race theory, but rather the need for it to be presented (or, as some feel, forced) into the public and general studies from elementary through high school.

Without stating a clearer explanation for understanding the “why and the how” this will be presented and taught to those who may “still believe in Santa Claus,” the National Education Association has determined to force feed it to the younger generations all while diminishing teaching our American history, with all of its warts, in a more balanced and critical way.

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As Mr. Pitts wrote, there are many things the white political right should fear, but “they fear nothing quite as much as the loss of their whiteness and its privileges.” Being white and a parent and having witnessed the public schools systematically devalue or rewrite the intent of the most valuable doctrine the Founding Fathers could have delivered, I worry where the country will be in 50 years. Not because I’m white. It’s a matter of where we’ve been and just how far we have come in the last 250 years. That is the history no longer being taught.

Karyn Skaggs, Columbia

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