Baltimore resident David Clark (left) talks with Suzzanne Monk of Washington, D.C. during a cleanup along Fulton Ave organized by Republican activist Scott Presler.
Baltimore resident David Clark (left) talks with Suzzanne Monk of Washington, D.C. during a cleanup along Fulton Ave organized by Republican activist Scott Presler. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun)

I almost think that the Baltimore Sun editorial board considers themselves as overseers of Baltimore rather than caretakers. I say this because of their article questioning the motive of a group of conservatives for coming into Baltimore and cleaning up trash (“We assume it was pure motives that led a Trump supporter to launch a cleanup in Cummings’ district, right?” Aug. 6). The board talks of the clean-up as reinforcing the tired image of the failing urban cores and that poor people can’t take care of their own neighborhoods. Why isn’t the editorial board speaking of “our” neighborhoods instead of “their” neighborhoods?

The editorial board defends “their” neighbors who don’t clean up because there are drug dealers who use trash to hide their product and threaten people who try to clean it up. Maybe the board should be warning Scott Presler, the organizer of the cleanup, “Don’t go into ‘their’ neighborhoods! It’s not safe there for you! Leave the trash!” Doesn’t the board understand that they are simply reinforcing the plight of Baltimore?

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And to top it off, the editorial board says, “We’ll see how clean the neighborhood still is when he returns in September.” Seems the board is saying, “What’s the point of a clean-up? Their neighborhoods won’t change.”

Patrick Walsh, Linthicum

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