xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Unchecked pollution at Conowingo gives cause for alarm | READER COMMENTARY

A new 50-year license for the Conowingo Dam got key federal approval recently, but environmental groups say the agreement is a missed opportunity to compel Exelon, which runs the dam, to do more to stop pollutants flowing down the Susquehanna River and into the Chesapeake Bay. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun).
A new 50-year license for the Conowingo Dam got key federal approval recently, but environmental groups say the agreement is a missed opportunity to compel Exelon, which runs the dam, to do more to stop pollutants flowing down the Susquehanna River and into the Chesapeake Bay. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun). (Kenneth K. Lam)

As I jog past the Georgetown waterfront, I am revolted by the brown and reeking Potomac River. Residents downstream of the Conowingo Dam may experience similar conditions in the future. The recent article, “Citing nutrient pollution, environmental groups appeal new 50-year license for Conowingo Dam” (April 22) by Christine Condon, encourages protesting to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Exelon about the damage the dam could cause without changes.

While the dam has the purpose of keeping pollutants and debris out of the Susquehanna River, it is currently full, and big storms could push these materials into the river all at once. Not only will the pollutants harm the river ecosystems, but the dam could release millions of trapped fish including invasive species. As a student at Georgetown University, I know what it’s like to live next to a polluted river. I would never wish this on the people near the Susquehanna River.

Advertisement

In a 2019 settlement, Maryland waived a water quality certification in return for $200 million from Exelon toward resolving its sedimentary, trash, and fish trapping dilemmas. Although there have been setbacks due to the COVID-19 pandemic, advances in vaccinations show promise toward future uses of these funds.

Grace Sun, North Potomac

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement