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College should still be about learning, not playing a sport | READER COMMENTARY

Loyola University Maryland's Ryan McNulty (55) celebrates as Colton Teitelbaum (0) comes up with a save on the final play to secure an 11-10 win for the Greyhounds over visiting Rutgers University at Ridley Athletic Complex last month
Loyola University Maryland's Ryan McNulty (55) celebrates as Colton Teitelbaum (0) comes up with a save on the final play to secure an 11-10 win for the Greyhounds over visiting Rutgers University at Ridley Athletic Complex last month (Larry French/Larry French)

A recent article in The Sun’s sports section talked about a Maryland high school senior “who is committed to play at Loyola Maryland next year…” What? A student is admitted not to study and learn at a college but to play a sport? What happens to our institutions of higher learning when admitting and educating future world citizens, some of whom will be our eventual leaders, becomes secondary in importance to hiring professional athletes (“Baltimore-area college coaches trying to be creative in communicating with athletes restricted to home by coronavirus pandemic,” March 28)?

As we worry about the quality of education in our public schools, we should consider the effect on that quality of having students who are there only to excel sufficiently in sports to attain college admission. The purchasing of students by colleges should be illegal.

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Elaine Pardoe, Ellicott City

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