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Maryland firefighters are battling blazes around the U.S. (Baltimore Sun video)

Tuesday was a BGE energy saver day, and we turned off the air conditioning and headed to the basement thinking we were doing our part in saving energy and protecting the environment. Subsequent front page coverage in The Baltimore Sun revealing the scope of the wildfires in California provided a vivid reminder that more than our puny efforts are going to be needed if we are serious about protecting our environment (“Biggest blaze in California history challenges firefighters,” Aug. 7).

This summer's news has been full of extraordinary weather and climate change related events. In addition to the disaster in California, record temperatures are being recorded all across the globe and we have seen startling satellite pictures of a parched, and very brown, Great Britain. A friend of ours in Japan recently wrote that her community had experienced its first ever 100-degree day. Some news reports have predicted that in the future parts of the globe would become uninhabitable by humans.

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A foreign leader recently said there is no "Planet B," as he encouraged action to address climate change. Unfortunately, the United States is now hindering international efforts to save the only planet we have. That is mindless. One of our two political parties offers tepid solutions to address climate change challenges, while the other loudly denies they even exist.

If we do nothing, the children who start kindergarten in a couple of weeks will live long enough to see Baltimore's Inner Harbor, the Naval Academy and the Ocean City Boardwalk all under water. The reopening of the schools after Labor Day is also the start of the campaign season. Please ask those running for office what they plan to do to save planet earth — our children's and grandchildren's futures depend on what we do now.

James L. Scott, Ellicott City

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