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Cost of climate change to Maryland is big, really big

If saltwater regularly soaked your basement or first floor, kept you from getting to work, or damaged your car, how often would it have to happen before you began looking for a new place to call home? (Union of Concerned Scientists / YouTube)

Dan Rodricks’ column about the costs of mitigating the impacts of climate change only scratches the surface of the costs here on the Chesapeake Bay (“Maryland estimate for seawalls against rising tides: $27 billion,” June 28). A classmate of mine at William & Mary working for the Center for Climate Integrity has estimated Virginia’s cost to address future flooding at $40 billion.

As you know, this country faces a list of budgetary needs (roads, bridges, care for veterans, health care, etc.). Unfortunately, the Republicans have put us in a huge budget hole at the worst possible time. I have started telling my conservative friends who say we have to cut spending that our real problem is on the income side. Tax cuts do not trickle down and pay for themselves. That has never happened despite Arthur Laffer's claims. Yes, cut where we can but also add to agencies like IRS to increase tax collections. And make everyone pay a fair share — including corporations.

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Begin by stop catering to cars and fossil fuels. We need more mass transit, period. No more beltway lanes or another Bay Bridge. They will fill up as fast as you build them. We need to think about restricting building in areas prone to flooding. We are at the point of needing to take some drastic action.

Steve Mitchell, Ellicott City

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