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Bubblers: A way to save Chesapeake Bay wildlife | READER COMMENTARY

Oysters infected with the disease Dermo are kept in Denise Breitburg's lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center as she tests how changing oxygen and carbon dioxide levels affect Dermo infections in Chesapeake Bay oysters. (Pamela Wood/Capital Gazette).
Oysters infected with the disease Dermo are kept in Denise Breitburg's lab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center as she tests how changing oxygen and carbon dioxide levels affect Dermo infections in Chesapeake Bay oysters. (Pamela Wood/Capital Gazette). (By Pamela Wood - The Capital, Capital Gazette)

Low or no oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay isn’t merely a cause of skimpier oysters (”Smithsonian study finds more bad news about climate change: skimpier Chesapeake Bay oysters,” March 6). Crabs and fish also need oxygen to breathe. Fish kills from dead zones of low oxygen cause the bay to have poorer water quality, a vicious circle of environmental degradation.

This is a situation that calls for geoengineering. The government should act by building a series of solar powered barges that could be strategically placed near vulnerable areas of the bay.

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The collected solar energy would be used to pump air down to the bottom of the dead zones. The air would be released through bubblers similar to the bubblers in aquariums, but much larger.

This, along with preventing runoff of fertilizer from farms, can improve the overall bay water quality. As the bay water clears, the underwater grasses could be replenished.

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All these geoengineering interventions can restore the quality of the bay to the way it was 100 years ago. That should be the goal of the Chesapeake Bay Geoengineering Project.

Henry Farkas, Pikesville

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