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Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards arrives to address supporters at his election night watch party in Baton Rouge, La. Voters reelected Mr. Edwards to a second term, as he defeated Republican businessman Eddie Rispone.
Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards arrives to address supporters at his election night watch party in Baton Rouge, La. Voters reelected Mr. Edwards to a second term, as he defeated Republican businessman Eddie Rispone. (Matthew Hinton/AP)

Jonah Goldberg makes the point that it’s better for a policy to have support in both parties “because that is the best way to ensure that your preferred policy can survive an election disaster. If your party loses its majority in Washington, your cause isn’t automatically in jeopardy (“Goldberg: Louisiana governor win a victory for conservatives," Nov. 22).

This is why it’s so important to find bipartisan support for climate change legislation. And we’re starting to see it. There are four bipartisan carbon pricing bills in Congress right now. One of these, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (H.R. 763), has 73 co-sponsors, including Reps. Ruppersberger, Trone and Raskin from Maryland.

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Columbia University recently published a study of this bill, concluding that it would substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, drastically cut air pollution from power plants and shift electricity generation to cleaner sources.

Climate change is damaging red, blue and purple states alike. We need politicians from red, blue and purple states to come together to address it.

Cheryl Arney

The writer is a volunteer with Citizens Climate Lobby.

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