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Let city residents take responsibility for cleaner streets | READER COMMENTARY

Earlene Brown, 81, wheels several bags of trash up S. Wickham Road after sweeping debris from the 4800 block of Stafford Street. Brown, who says "I got tired of sitting down," recently moved to the area and adds, "This is what I did when I was on the East Side." July 25, 2020. (Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun).
Earlene Brown, 81, wheels several bags of trash up S. Wickham Road after sweeping debris from the 4800 block of Stafford Street. Brown, who says "I got tired of sitting down," recently moved to the area and adds, "This is what I did when I was on the East Side." July 25, 2020. (Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun). (Kim Hairston/Baltimore Sun)

The Sun makes a compelling case for raising the level of pay for the next head of Baltimore Department of Public Works (”Baltimore public works leadership: It’s about performance, not pay,” March 11). The city does have a tremendous number of infrastructure and other challenges that will require highly competent leadership in order to be successfully addressed. One task that should not be on the agenda for the new department head is cleaner streets. That responsibility rests squarely on the shoulders of each and every resident and visitor to Baltimore.

Something other than new street sweepers is needed. Our citizens need to lead the way by not tossing trash from their cars. They need to find another place to toss waste when the street side trash can is full. They need to take their yard waste to a legal disposal site and not dump it in the roadway median. We can keep the streets clean with a change in our behaviors that reflects a civilized approach to urban living.

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Michael Maguire, Baltimore

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