xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Baltimore's woes rooted in inequality

Supporters of the Baltimore Ceasefire walk a meditation labyrinth at the YMCA in Waverly.
Supporters of the Baltimore Ceasefire walk a meditation labyrinth at the YMCA in Waverly. (Marie Machin/For City Paper)

As thoughtful people in Baltimore know, the city's history has been a tragic story of endemic inequality. Through racial policies that regulated who can live where, who can open a bank account, who can get a mortgage and who can escape the perils of lingering lead paint and pipes, systemically reduced possibilities for employment and especially neglect of schools and pre-schools, minority communities have suffered (“Don’t blame Target for a business decision,” Nov. 27).

Comparing YMCAs in two contrasting communities, as Maggie Master's original commentary did (“The tale of two Targets, a Baltimore segregation story,” Nov. 20), offered no attack on the YMCA as an institution. Baltimore has massive and systemic social problems and needs solutions beyond the single yardstick of profitability.

Advertisement

If letter writer Michael Shortt, a Georgia resident, is interested in how Baltimore developed the problems we have, may I suggest he read “Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City” by Antero Pietila.

Mary Dagold, Pikesville

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement