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The constant wail of sirens has become a worrisome part of my everyday life | READER COMMENTARY

A Baltimore County Police officer sits in his car near the home of fellow officer Amy S. Caprio who was killed by a teen who ran her over with his car in 2018. The teen was sentenced to life in prison last year.
A Baltimore County Police officer sits in his car near the home of fellow officer Amy S. Caprio who was killed by a teen who ran her over with his car in 2018. The teen was sentenced to life in prison last year. (MATT BUTTON / AEGIS STAFF / Baltimore Sun Media Group)

It’s 8:42 a.m. on a Saturday, and I hear the first sirens for today. I’m trying something new where I count how many times I hear them from the time I wake up until the time I go to sleep. (“18-year-old found dead in Lansdowne, Baltimore County police investigating as homicide,” Feb 3).

I am not new to Maryland, but I am new to Baltimore. In my hometown of Annapolis, sirens are not included in my daily routine, but when I’m on campus, they become ritualistic. They’re there when I’m walking to class, when I’m studying for an exam, when I’m taking a shower. They’re even there when I’m sleeping. The sirens accompany me wherever I go, and this is the one friend I wish I never had.

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Kaila Hodge, Towson

The writer is an undergraduate student at Towson University.

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