Advertisement

The difference between city and county schools

William E. "Brit" Kirwan, chair of the Commission on Innovation and Excellence in Education, explains the Kirwan Commissions recommendations for Maryland's public schools. (Kenneth K. Lam, Baltimore Sun video)

Even though much has been written, sometimes the contrast between city and county schools is so great that continued reporting is needed (“Why aren't Md. parents talking about the Kirwan Commission?” Feb. 28).

Last week, I was fortunate to be a guest at a public school play in the Lutherville-Timonium area. This performance involved perhaps 75 children from first to fifth grades on stage and in the chorus. The audience was packed to capacity with excited parents and anticipatory guests.

Advertisement

The children who had been rehearsing since October did not miss a beat. Everything was very well coordinated and there was no overt misbehavior.

Alas, the students and audience were predominantly white with Asians and persons of Indian origin as the next largest ethnic groups, and only a few black students.

Having worked in city schools for years, I never witnessed such a positive display by students and families. Is this where the racial divide now stands? Are we to believe that the influx of millions of dollars as legislated through the Kirwan Commission will be the catalyst to foster a cohesive, uplifting experience like this universally?

Or is the dichotomy so great in this situation that it is beyond what money can help to rectify?

Joyce Wolpert, Baltimore

Advertisement
Advertisement