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Childhood poverty is a problem for all of us | READER COMMENTARY

In this July 28, 2021 photo, Christina Darling and her sons, Brennan, 4, left, and Kayden, 10, pose for a photo at home in Nashua, N.H. after learning they'd qualified for the expanded child tax credit, part of President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
In this July 28, 2021 photo, Christina Darling and her sons, Brennan, 4, left, and Kayden, 10, pose for a photo at home in Nashua, N.H. after learning they'd qualified for the expanded child tax credit, part of President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola) (Elise Amendola/AP)

To paraphrase James Carville, “It’s about the children, stupid.”

While regrettable that the advance child tax credit payments allow some taxpayers to stay unemployed, who cares ultimately? Only the people who think they somehow suffer because they are supporting “freeloaders” with their hard-earned taxes, that’s who. Often times, these parents are not trying to “get over” on society at all. But the children suffer in poverty whether their parents are bums or just unlucky. Children of poor people don’t deserve poverty either way.

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Yes, it’s your hard-earned money that goes towards taxes, and you do have a say in how they spend it. But the say you have comes in the form of the people you elect and ends there (”David Brooks: Joe Biden is succeeding,” Nov. 22). You, as a taxpayer, do not possess a line item veto power that allows you to pick and choose which government programs you will or will not allow your money to fund. Once the government decides a program is worthy of enacting and the people vote to support it, you are not harmed just because you don’t agree with the program. If you want to change that, by all means, vote in someone new or run for office yourself.

The world is made up of all kinds of people including freeloaders. The government has chosen the role to support all of society and, in this case, particularly the children. The children should remain the center of focus for the federal Child Tax Credit, not the parents.

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Harry Hammond, Finksburg

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