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Any list of top Baltimore restaurants of yesteryear must include Chesapeake | READER COMMENTARY

With the end of Prohibition, Morris Friedman remakes his Charles Street delicatessen into a full-scale restaurant he names the Chesapeake Restaurant. It would evolve into one of Baltimore's best-known seafood restaurants for 50 years but was also famed for its charcoal broiled steaks, introduced to Baltimore by Morris' son Sidney in the 1930s. "Cut your steak with a fork, else tear up your check and walk out," becomes a well-known slogan. This is how the restaurant appeared in 2003. (Baltimore Sun photo).
With the end of Prohibition, Morris Friedman remakes his Charles Street delicatessen into a full-scale restaurant he names the Chesapeake Restaurant. It would evolve into one of Baltimore's best-known seafood restaurants for 50 years but was also famed for its charcoal broiled steaks, introduced to Baltimore by Morris' son Sidney in the 1930s. "Cut your steak with a fork, else tear up your check and walk out," becomes a well-known slogan. This is how the restaurant appeared in 2003. (Baltimore Sun photo). (Baltimore Sun photo)

The list of Baltimore restaurants (”Retro Baltimore: The restaurants that left us, and their mark on the city,” Aug. 12) that helped to make the city a food mecca left out one of the most well-respected restaurants — the Chesapeake Restaurant on Charles Street.

If you wanted a great steak and wanted to be seen among the movers and shakers, you headed to the Chesapeake. I still remember going there often before or after an O’s game as a kid in the late ‘50s to watch the gussied up adults order a prime steak or seafood dish second to none. It served the finest food to the elite for decades.

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Barry Scher, Annapolis

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