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Post-Annapolis, lawmakers ignore guns

Funeral for sports reporter John McNamara who was killed at The Annapolis Capital offices along with four other staff members.

Barely two weeks out from the horrific shooting at the Capital Gazette, it's clear that, once again, we can expect little political response or action in the wake of yet another gun-induced tragedy. The urge to memorialize the victims of gun violence is noble and appropriate ("Fate of shooting sites as different as events," July 12), but it is a pattern that has become depressingly familiar.

It seems a distinctly American way of coping with this problem: Treat the symptoms; don't cure the disease. Plaques are erected, crosses and flowers placed, floors in hotels renumbered, furniture rearranged, and nothing really changes. These shootings are, eventually, swept under the rug and continue apace, the public increasingly numb to their appalling regularity.

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Sadly, the bloodbath will continue for as long as Congress declines to take substantive measures to restrict the right to own assault weapons, and unless the Supreme Court upholds gun restrictions that currently exist or are enacted in the future.

Graham Coursey, Mount Vernon, Ohio

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