xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Pancreatic versus prostate cancer: Both require screening | READER COMMENTARY

“Jeopardy” host Alex Trebek. The Hartford Courant has been the subject of numerous questions on the show over the years, including ones that exploit how the paper's name sounds like "current" or "currant."
“Jeopardy” host Alex Trebek. The Hartford Courant has been the subject of numerous questions on the show over the years, including ones that exploit how the paper's name sounds like "current" or "currant."

There was obviously a mistake in the headline in the commentary about prostate cancer screening that appeared Sunday in the print edition of The Baltimore Sun (“Insurers should cover pancreatic cancer screening,” Feb. 23). It mentioned pancreatic cancer, when it meant prostate cancer, but the message in the headline is still correct. While pancreatic cancer is less common than prostate cancer, it is far deadlier.

For all stages of pancreatic cancer combined, the one-year relative survival rate is about 20% and the five-year rate only 5-to-10%. However, there is the potential for cure if small asymptomatic cancers are detected at a very early stage. Screening is not recommended for persons at average risk but for those at high risk because of a positive family history or carriage of certain genetic markers, early screening by endoscopic ultrasound or MRI is recommended.

Advertisement

There is an urgent need for more public education regarding screening protocols. Hopefully, insurance coverage for screening will not be an issue.

Dr. Beryl Rosenstein, Pikesville

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement