Brian Prechtl, co-chair of the BSO musician's union speaks before Baltimore Symphony Musicians perform at the Oregon Ridge Park “Independence Day Extravaganza.” The event is presented by Baltimore County.
Brian Prechtl, co-chair of the BSO musician's union speaks before Baltimore Symphony Musicians perform at the Oregon Ridge Park “Independence Day Extravaganza.” The event is presented by Baltimore County. (Kim Hairston / Baltimore Sun)

The article, "Shaky BSO finances leave endowment chiefs skittish about forking over cash, pondering orchestra’s successor” (July 10), points to a very shaky situation for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. With $10 million of debt hanging over them, the prospects look bleak for a successful recovery. Plus, you have highly skilled and dedicated musicians looking for work to survive until things pick up.

Perhaps the bigger question here and across Baltimore is what happens when the money runs out? To lose the orchestra would be a huge loss to the arts community, but there are many other factors in play here. This week’s flooding downtown from a broken water main point to a crisis of crumbling infrastructure within public utilities that have to be repaired but greatly add to the water bill everyone pays. People are already hard pressed to pay their bills, but they know that increases are coming.

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Property taxes are already the highest in the state, yet they do not provide the city with enough money to pay for fixing the multitude of problems at hand. Income taxes take a hefty toll on everyone in Maryland, yet there appears to be no solution but to raise them even higher. What happens when the tipping point is reached and droves of Marylanders bail out and move to low tax states? Who will be left to pay the bills?

Dan Crumpler

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