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BSO leadership must face the music - live and on stage

Baltimore Symphony Orchestra oboist Michael Lisicky, second left, conveys a message to Gov. Hogan as fellow members of the brass section played music as they staged a protest at the State House. The musicians want to send a message to Gov. Hogan asking him to release $1.6 million in state funding to the BSO.
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra oboist Michael Lisicky, second left, conveys a message to Gov. Hogan as fellow members of the brass section played music as they staged a protest at the State House. The musicians want to send a message to Gov. Hogan asking him to release $1.6 million in state funding to the BSO. (Kenneth Lam / Baltimore Sun)

My wife and I have been Baltimore Symphony Orchestra subscribers for a number of years. We have enjoyed many outstanding concerts and individual solo performances during this time. We are not significant donors, but we would like to think of our regular attendance as a vote of public support. At this point, we continue to hope the musicians will return to the stage and make wonderful music for many years to come (“The BSO should have been transparent about its financial crisis all along,” July 17).

Right now, however, what I would really like to see is an appearance by the current BSO board members and the chairman on the Meyerhoff stage. But rather than make music, they would act out the discussions that took place over the last several years related to the orchestra’s systemic financial problems. This would be followed by a question and answer session with the audience.

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Here’s my question: “You were in charge: Why has it come to this?”

Ray Herman, Baltimore

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