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Readers Respond

The return of the book banners | READER COMMENTARY

Amanda Darrow, director of youth, family and education programs at the Utah Pride Center, poses with books that have been the subject of complaints from parents in Salt Lake City on Dec. 16, 2021. The wave of attempted book banning and restrictions continues to intensify, the American Library Association recently reported. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Leonard Pitts bemoans the resurgence of book banning by “self-appointed guardians of public morality” (”Leonard Pitts Jr.: What do the book banners and burners fear?” Sept. 19). Unfortunately, the literary porno posse will always be with us, banning books for the flimsiest of reasons.

In 2006, Kansas banned E.B. White’s children’s classic, “Charlotte’s Web” because “talking animals are blasphemous and unnatural” and passages about the spider dying were also criticized as being “inappropriate subject matter for a children’s book.” That particular banning can be easily understood. After all, it’s Kansas.

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Years ago, the late automobile maker Henry Ford said “I don’t like to read books. They muss up my mind.” Well, maybe some books should “muss up” some minds.

— Otts Laupus, Elkridge

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