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A shortened Major League Baseball season in Baltimore-Washington? That’s an idea worth exploring | READER COMMENTARY

In this aerial photo, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is closed on what would've been Opening Day, Thursday March 26, 2020, in Baltimore. The Orioles were slated to host the New York Yankees at the park, but the season has been delayed due to the coronavirus outbreak. What if a shortened season could be played there and in other local stadiums?
In this aerial photo, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is closed on what would've been Opening Day, Thursday March 26, 2020, in Baltimore. The Orioles were slated to host the New York Yankees at the park, but the season has been delayed due to the coronavirus outbreak. What if a shortened season could be played there and in other local stadiums? (Steve Helber/AP)

In response to the commentary by Rip Watson, “Washington-Baltimore region the perfect place for a salvaged Major League Baseball season” (April 28), and as an avid sports fan as well as someone who is eagerly awaiting an end to the stay-at-home reality that become the norm, I admire the idea. So often the Maryland and District of Columbia area is overlooked. Nationally, D.C. is almost never mentioned in the same breath as New York, Chicago or Los Angeles. What a way this would be to bring national attention to the area.

I must assume that those entities that control the necessary facilities could be convinced. Not only would it be an opportunity for many smaller ballparks to host MLB action — something that most of them surely would never have thought possible — it is also an unparalleled opportunity to bring jobs back to the area quickly. Something that is much needed. I just worry that Gov. Larry Hogan would not allow it.

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Governor Hogan has, from the beginning, taken a strong stance against the coronavirus and anything that could propagate its spread. While the governor has outlined his plans for reopening the state in phases, we must reach a 14-day decline before that can begin. Even once achieved, I can’t help but think he might see the travel and human interaction that would come with professional baseball in the area as a possible harbor for a backslide.

Of course, sufficient precautions should be taken before inviting professional baseball into our backyard. However, once that were to be achieved, I can only hope Mr. Hogan would be open to the idea. What a way it would be for people living in the region to heal together.

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Angelo F. Petruccy, Perry Hall

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