Volunteers clear an alley strewn with trash near Fulton Ave Monday morning. They were inspired to come out and help by Scott Presler, a Republican activist who organized the cleanup via Twitter.
Volunteers clear an alley strewn with trash near Fulton Ave Monday morning. They were inspired to come out and help by Scott Presler, a Republican activist who organized the cleanup via Twitter. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun)

Your editorial, “We assume it was pure motives that led a Trump supporter to launch a cleanup in Cummings’ district, right?" (Aug. 6), not only displayed your less-than-positive feelings about President Donald Trump, but demonstrated the type of thinking that contributes to the poor living conditions in West Baltimore.

As your article acknowledged, over 170 non-residents of the community contributed their time and effort in the hot sun to remove the trash of others. While questioning the motives of those individuals you did not question why the residents of that area would throw trash on the streets, not pick trash up within their own neighborhood, or cease enabling the drug dealers who “use trash to hide products” by finding ways to confidentially inform police of who these dealers are. The Sun seems to imply that the residents of these neighborhoods lack the concern, commitment and capabilities to address these problems.

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So what if the volunteers who cleaned the trash were Trump supporters? They did more to help the citizens of those West Baltimore neighborhoods than the Trump critics whose community support seldom goes beyond verbalizing criticisms and unrealistic promises. The Sun would contribute more to help the citizens of these neighborhoods by objectively addressing the root cause of their living conditions rather than taking the popular path of casting blame on President Trump.

Charlotte Eliopoulos, Glen Arm

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