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Springtime in Baltimore: Let’s clean up our act | READER COMMENTARY

In 2012, volunteers cleaning up Leakin Park discovered a severely decomposed dead body. This is not considered especially unusual in the 1,200-acre city park. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun).
In 2012, volunteers cleaning up Leakin Park discovered a severely decomposed dead body. This is not considered especially unusual in the 1,200-acre city park. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun). (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun)

Yesterday was another beautiful day in the neighborhood. I, along with a fellow city resident, have been taking regular Tuesday morning hikes in local environs. We planned to meet in Winans Meadow parking lot, an entry point into Leakin Park. However, when we each arrived at 9:30 a.m., we were met by police and the yellow tape identifying this as a crime scene. I remarked the obvious, “Don’t tell me you found another body in Leakin Park?” The officer replied with probably all he could say at the time which was, “OK, I won’t tell you that.”

My suspicions were finally confirmed late evening when I called the police station, although, to date, I have seen nothing in the news about this.

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We then found ourselves going to Ashburton, wandering past grand mansions along the reservoir as well as meandering onto side streets. Homes here were more modest yet equally lovely. However, even in this relatively upscale city neighborhood, gutters were full of trash, abandoned cars without license plates were on the street, and drivers roared past intersections ignoring stop signs. My walking companion also spied some drug sales.

We parted, and as I was driving east on Hilton, a city bus moved into the left turn only lane, going around me, then heading straight across Liberty Heights going through a red light.

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I came home and read breaking news about the removal of the Capt. John O’Donnell statue in Canton and saw people cheering as his figure was lay prone in the street. I am straining to make the connection. If people hope to feel more respected by having public spaces reflect their enhanced self-image, does that mean they will also find ways to show respect in our wider public sphere?

Joyce Wolpert, Baltimore

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