xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Baltimore does, indeed, rock | READER COMMENTARY

Seen from above, Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area in Owings Mills has large areas where plant growth is stunted. These ecosystems sit on top of serpentinite, an oceanic rock high in magnesium with few essential nutrients for plant growth. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun).
Seen from above, Soldiers Delight Natural Environmental Area in Owings Mills has large areas where plant growth is stunted. These ecosystems sit on top of serpentinite, an oceanic rock high in magnesium with few essential nutrients for plant growth. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun). (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun)

It took me back in time to when I was a volunteer with the Friends of Loch Raven Library. One of my jobs was to line up speakers for our speakers series. One of our guests was a geologist, Ira May, who spoke about the history of Baltimore County’s ancient rocks and mining sites on July 10, 2013. His speech was titled — by me — “Baltimore Rocks!”

Advertisement

Incidentally, we tried to coordinate our themes with those of the public library’s summer reading program to encourage the children to come to the evening lectures with their parents or guardians. The theme that year was “Dig into Reading.”

Leslea Knauff, Towson

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement