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Police union should not seek an early death to its members | READER COMMENTARY

Boxes containing the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine sit next to vials in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital for distribution, in east Denver, Colorado. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski).
Boxes containing the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine sit next to vials in the pharmacy of National Jewish Hospital for distribution, in east Denver, Colorado. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski). (David Zalubowski/AP)

It appears that the police union wants its members, and the people whom the police are sworn to serve and protect, to die (”Baltimore Police union tells officers not to disclose COVID vaccine status as city deadline nears,” Oct. 15).

This is a very strange situation. Union leaders are supposed to advocate for safety in the workplace. The police have to interact with, sometimes arrest and sometimes rescue, people in the community who might be infected with COVID-19. The pandemic is still on.

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Being vaccinated is a bit like wearing a bulletproof vest. It might not be 100% effective, but it’s way better than no protection at all. If police officers are in a gun battle, their chance of survival is much better if they are wearing a bulletproof vest.

Similarly, if police officers walk into a room where there are COVID-19 viruses in the air, their chance of survival is much better — 10,000 times better — if they are fully vaccinated.

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The police union should be fighting for protecting the lives of its people by insisting that police officers get vaccinated for free.

Henry Farkas, Pikesville

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