Maybe Baltimore overdoses are higher than the rest of the state because there are so many methadone clinics.
Maybe Baltimore overdoses are higher than the rest of the state because there are so many methadone clinics. (Jed Kirschbaum /)

Your editorial only explains part of the uptick in overdoses that take place within Baltimore (“Baltimore’s uptick in overdoses explained,” Oct 3). It does not consider that on one eight block area in Central Baltimore, known as Old Goucher, has a total of eight clinics that serve this drug dependent population. Within those borders live about 4,000 people, but within any week 8,000-plus addicts frequent these clinics and are then serviced by another group of individuals who sell the drugs that cause these overdoses. One clinic is attempting to get permission to sell to not only 1,000 addicts, but increase the amount to 1,500, thus increasing the volume of these individuals seeking services from 8,000 to 8,500.

The article states, “Word gets out, and people make their way to the city to get help with their addiction, even though they live elsewhere,” and they arrive by car, bus and train to a neighborhood of eight blocks to get their medicine. The article points out that there are not enough facilities to help the growing need of these individuals, but there is no logic that I can conceive that they all need to be centered in one community. We see the daily ritual of the walking dead through the community, the hustling to get to the service provider and the street sales of the product that is creating the problems because the location of these eight clinics is known throughout the city.

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As a resolution, why not simply put these facilities in the areas of concern? From the records that are hopefully maintained by the clinics, one could find out the addresses of those individuals that require assistance, and on the basis of that, locate a clinic in that area. If some are coming from Pennsylvania, then report their movements here to the medical authorities in that state so that they can provide the assistance to these individuals. It is not fair to the community, to the individuals that require these drugs to have to travel from far off locations to come to a singular neighborhood to get their required drugs.

Christian H. Wilson, Baltimore

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