xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Focusing on race does city and mayoral candidates a disservice | READER COMMENTARY

Baltimore 2020 mayor candidates, (top, left to right) Sheila Dixon, TJ Smith, Mary Miller, (bottom, left to right) Brandon Scott, Thiru Vignarajah and Jack Young.
Baltimore 2020 mayor candidates, (top, left to right) Sheila Dixon, TJ Smith, Mary Miller, (bottom, left to right) Brandon Scott, Thiru Vignarajah and Jack Young.(Baltimore Sun / Baltimore Sun)

Pastor Kevin Slayton laments the large number of African-Americans in the race for mayor of Baltimore, ignoring completely the breadth of choice they, along with the other candidates, offer to voters (“Baltimore’s black voters can’t afford to be divided this mayoral election,” May 19). His point is that so many African-Americans on the ballot make it more likely that the next mayor will not represent the “best interests” of the black community. The thinly-veiled implication of this statement is that unless the next mayor is African-American, the best interests of the black community will not be served.

Putting aside the logical disconnect between Rev. Slayton’s premise and his conclusion, has he forgotten the dream expressed by Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. almost 57 years ago that all people be judged by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin? Shouldn’t we, the citizens of Baltimore, make such an important decision based upon the qualifications and character of the candidates rather than their ethnicity?

Advertisement

Benjamin Rosenberg, Baltimore

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement