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Momentum building for a cleaner Baltimore | READER COMMENTARY

Yvette Stokes picks up litter in the 1600 block of Presstman Street in Baltimore. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun).
Yvette Stokes picks up litter in the 1600 block of Presstman Street in Baltimore. (Amy Davis/Baltimore Sun). (Amy Davis)

Wonderful it is to see momentum building to clean up Baltimore! This is the time to expand the Department of Public Works pilot program and, as your recent editorial urges, it’s a time to aim high (”Cleaning up one neighborhood is good. Cleaning up all of Baltimore — while creating lots of jobs — is much better,” April 13). This is not a time for incremental change.

I am a new resident of Baltimore, and I am dismayed to see trash everywhere, at all entrances into the city and to see trash being thrown out of cars, apparently without thinking. I remember earlier anti-trash campaigns promoted pro bono by the Ad Council. Those public service announcements engaged school kids (in 7th grade quite some time ago we performed “Don’t be a Litter Bug” plays), public agencies and officials, local businesses and civic participation and pride.

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A public service campaign right now could appeal to and highlight diverse communities in Baltimore, educate, encourage enthusiasm and enlist a wide range of leaders to create the will and support the vision to be the cleanest, greenest of cities. What is it that benches I have spotted along Harford Road say about “Greatest” Baltimore? A worthy aspiration. Many projects suggest themselves for clean-up efforts and volunteers are ready to join a workforce of paid employees. A real win-win in this time of need and opportunity.

Jane Huntington, Baltimore

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