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Boards cover the front end of a abandoned row homes near Baltimore's Hollins House, a high rise building housing seniors and persons with disabilities, which was toured by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson in July.
Boards cover the front end of a abandoned row homes near Baltimore's Hollins House, a high rise building housing seniors and persons with disabilities, which was toured by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson in July. (Julio Cortez/AP)

Seema D. Iyer advocates additional investment in Baltimore as a crime reduction strategy (“A $225 million investment in Baltimore,” Oct. 20). This puts the cart before the horse: No one will invest when there is no protection of the asset.

The largest expenditure in most businesses is people. When Baltimore gives a paroled murderer probation for carrying a firearm, Baltimore signals it has no interest in investment. When it fails to prevent, investigate and prosecute assaults and robberies downtown, it signals it has no interest in investment. And when it decries responsibility for the egregious level of crime plaguing the city, it confirms that it has no interest in investment.

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Investors can look forward to security costs, medical costs and the unshakable fear things will get even worse. They are well advised to take their dollars elsewhere. Baltimore clearly does not desire their funds.

Michael Williams, Linthicum Heights

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