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Lowering homicide numbers requires more than meetings | READER COMMENTARY

Baltimore Police officers investigate a crime scene at the Giant in Reisterstown Plaza where a grocery store armed security guard shot two people inside, killing one of them, after an altercation late Tuesday afternoon, July 13. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun). .
Baltimore Police officers investigate a crime scene at the Giant in Reisterstown Plaza where a grocery store armed security guard shot two people inside, killing one of them, after an altercation late Tuesday afternoon, July 13. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun). . (Ulysses Muñoz)

I was eager to read the outcome of the meeting of the Maryland congressional delegation with city officials. However, it apparently produced only plans for more plans (”Maryland’s congressional delegation meets with Baltimore mayor, police commissioner to discuss ways to quell violence,” July 13).

U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin says the meeting was called because the “current level of violence is unacceptable.” That is certainly true, as there have been at least 10 more fatal shootings in Baltimore then there were a year ago and more than 300 homicides a year since 2015. However, Mayor Brandon Scott did not seem too concerned, as he noted that cities all across the country were addressing violence “and want solutions that go beyond simply adding more police officers and increasing enforcement.”

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This seems an indication that the meeting was not one that would provide immediate action to address the violence. There was to be more rehashing of what policing and public safety actually looks like. Afterward, U.S. Sen. Chris Van Hollen said the discussion largely focused on the need for a “comprehensive strategy.” Somebody needs to tell the senator that Mayor Scott already developed a “comprehensive plan,” but there is little evidence that its implementation is making a difference.

Senator Cardin did say that “there are a lot of issues that we have to deal with and the federal delegation is committed to working with the mayor to provide support and help to bring down the violence in Baltimore. We have confidence that we can do this.” Perhaps the next meeting will deal with how they will do it, or perhaps the one after that.

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Robert Jervis, Pasadena

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