xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Follow Baltimore’s example on homicides? Isn’t that the problem? | READER COMMENTARY

Derrell Alston and Lamont Holt raise their fists as they walk with other members of Safe Streets Belair-Edison during a youth-led community march on Saturday, April 3, 2021. The neighborhood hasn't had a shooting or homicide since December 2020, according to site director Dante Johnson. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun)
Derrell Alston and Lamont Holt raise their fists as they walk with other members of Safe Streets Belair-Edison during a youth-led community march on Saturday, April 3, 2021. The neighborhood hasn't had a shooting or homicide since December 2020, according to site director Dante Johnson. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun) (Ulysses Muñoz/The Baltimore Sun)

You recently posted a commentary that made me howl. In the opinion of Larry S. Gibson, cities experiencing vast increases in murders should follow Baltimore’s example in dealing with homicides because it has leveled out here (”Baltimore’s homicide rate remains steady as others’ soar; perhaps the rest of the country should follow our lead,” June 28).

That is exactly what is happening, as other cities decided to do the exact same thing Baltimore is doing regarding crime and violence, which is to ignore the criminals causing it, blame the police for everything and not expose the political corruption of the justice system.

Advertisement

Baltimore has one of the nation’s highest per capita homicide rates, so I don’t think trying to compete with Baltimore on achieving that level of violence is at all an admirable goal. Also not mentioned is how all of the cities suffering with violent crime have Democratic mayors in charge.

Michael W. Kohlman, Parkville

Advertisement
Advertisement

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement