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Baltimore Police Department officers investigate a crime scene at Laurens and N. Carey streets on Monday.
Baltimore Police Department officers investigate a crime scene at Laurens and N. Carey streets on Monday. (Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun)

In a recent column, Dan Rodricks tells of the fantasy that overcame him while stopped for a red light on West Baltimore’s N. Fulton Avenue (“Dan Rodricks: Baltimore’s vacants remain symbols of failure and future,” Nov. 1). Four brick rowhouses had once been grand but now are very far from grand: “There’s nothing there but ghosts.” Essentially, Mr. Rodricks is wondering why these four homes cannot be restored to what they had once been.

In another recent column (“Rodricks: Baltimore has had big problems, but the nation has even bigger ones, and they’re hardly being addressed,” Aug. 19), Mr. Rodricks also got caught up in despair as he thought of the people of Baltimore losing faith that the city “can ever rise from this noxious muck of violent crime.”

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Rising from all the noxious muck is possible. But it’s unlikely as long as parents in the city continue to raise criminals, for whom nothing is more important than having a gun within easy reach. Every day, those responsible for raising kids must demonstrate in their own lives compassion and courage, honesty, truthfulness, responsibility and respect. Work on it, and one day the noxious muck will be gone.

Paul Marx, Towson

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