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City not only lacks Red Line, it has streets to repair — now | READER COMMENTARY

On March 28, 2020, the Jones Falls Expressway experienced a trickle of traffic in a view from the exit ramp to Druid Park Lake Drive as residents generally heed the call for social distancing and quarantine. The highway is much more congested during rush hours now.
On March 28, 2020, the Jones Falls Expressway experienced a trickle of traffic in a view from the exit ramp to Druid Park Lake Drive as residents generally heed the call for social distancing and quarantine. The highway is much more congested during rush hours now. (Karl Merton Ferron/The Baltimore Sun)

Following up on the front-page article about loss of the Red Line and lack of alternatives (“Five years later, many across Baltimore bitterly lament Gov. Hogan’s decision to kill the Red Line light rail,” Sept. 11), I would like to comment on an existing infrastructure into the city in sore need of upgrading.

Interstate-83 has been the main artery into the city for decades. With current pandemic-related fear of mass transit, it is the preferred alternative. However, on a recent rainy night, I drove from the city line to Cold Spring Lane and came upon three or four single-car accidents on the shoulder or sitting next to the center Jersey barrier. Lack of clear lane lines, little overhead lighting, hairpin curves and 70-miles-per-hour being the new 55-mph, I felt like I was descending into Dante’s Hell.

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As former Mayor William Donald Schaefer would have said: Fix it now!

David McMaster, Baltimore

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