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Stop complaining about people coming to clean up Baltimore

Trash and debris are seen in a lot near the Hollins House, a high rise building housing seniors and persons with disabilities, which was toured by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, Wednesday, July 31, in Baltimore. Carson said the Hollins House, which has 130 one-bedroom units, is an opportunity zone which encourages investment and development in distressed communities.
Trash and debris are seen in a lot near the Hollins House, a high rise building housing seniors and persons with disabilities, which was toured by U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, Wednesday, July 31, in Baltimore. Carson said the Hollins House, which has 130 one-bedroom units, is an opportunity zone which encourages investment and development in distressed communities. (Julio Cortez/AP)

What a petty, mean spirited column by Tricia Bishop (“Plenty of trash to go around in Baltimore,” Aug. 15)

It’s hard to imagine why anyone outside the city would help us after reading such a negative, angry column. For heavens sake, sometimes a helping hand is just that. I’ve written and called our invisible elected leaders many times about trash and have never gotten a response. At least Scott Pressler and John Rourke did something. I understand Councilman Leon Pinkett helped.

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The rest are too busy appearing at festivals and calling Gov. Larry Hogan a white nationalist to do anything.

D. TenHoopen, Baltimore

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