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Baltimore is still a beautiful place to live

Every spring brings constant reminders of resurrection and yes, good old Baltimore neighborhood pride. As I drive through my Gardenville neighborhood these days, every turn displays a splash of color, a brush stroke of brilliance. In yard after yard, I see glorious red, pink, fuchsia and white azaleas, many of them bought decades ago at Leaf’s Nurseries. Knock-out roses, carefully tended over generations of city dwellers, are in bloom on every block. The pastel pink, alabaster white and brilliant red blossoms of dogwood, magnolia, Japanese maple and Bradford pear trees frame hundreds of yards off Belair Road. Circlets of yellow daisies and daffodils and crimson tulips pop up again and again.

All of these natural art forms in the museum of my neighborhood remind me that, no matter who sits in City Hall, what promises about neighborhood reinvestment are broken, what investment is not encouraged by those we all placed in positions of trust in the voting booth, Baltimore will again thrive because of our gritty, determined, you dare-try-to-knock-me-down attitudes (“Baltimore Mayor Pugh’s home gets new $500 citation from city housing department over roof work,” April 23). Yes, the Baltimore of wondrous history and culture remains vibrant in every neighborhood because we will have it no other way.

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Ellen Marshall, Baltimore

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