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BMA uses the term ‘deaccession’ for a reason | READER COMMENTARY

“1957-G” by Clyfford Still is one of 3 paintings that may yet be deaccessioned by the Baltimore Museum of Art. File.
“1957-G” by Clyfford Still is one of 3 paintings that may yet be deaccessioned by the Baltimore Museum of Art. File. (Photography BMA / HANDOUT)

No, Dan Rodricks, museums do not use the word “deaccession” because “selling" is considered “crass” (”On the BMA sale fail, Maryland millionaires, Tuesday’s election and a few other things nobody asked about," Oct. 30).

They use it specifically to denote that the object was formally accessioned into the collection. They use it because selling accessioned items has legal and ethical ramifications. Museums also own objects that have never been accessioned. When those are sold they are simply sold. There is a huge difference.

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And trust me. No one, let alone the millionaires you believe are out there, will donate a penny to a museum that doesn’t live up to it’s legal and ethical obligations. Nor should they.

Ellen B. Cutlet, Aberdeen

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