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Hard to defend politicians who lie

President Donald Trump can be difficult to defend.
President Donald Trump can be difficult to defend. (Evan Vucci / AP)

There's nothing wrong with checking in with “the other side” and their opinions given the heated political debate that rages on these days. A problem arises, however when that other side is reduced to stating non-facts — also known as lying — when defending a position. To tell the truth would cripple their argument.

A recent letter in The Sun chastised the paper for the left-leaning take on their coverage of our Twitterer-in-Chief. The letter went on with negative opinions on various subjects, but when it came to stating a fact, the writer revealed his Donald Trump-like disdain for the truth in characterizing the Barack Obama years as those of “economic stagnation” (“Could The Sun be more anti-Trump?” Jan. 18).

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The Dow Jones Industrial Average is probably the standard most often used to take the economic temperature of the country. It doesn't really reflect anything other than that, but it is a useful indicator for what it does. How stagnant was the economy under our previous president? When President Obama was inaugurated in January of 2009, the average stood at 7,949. When he left office in January of 2017, it stood at 19,732, having more than doubled. Only a purveyor of "alternative facts," an invention of the current administration, could call this stagnation.

It is not the fault of The Sun that the voice of the opposition is so often a mistaken voice. What other recourse does the newspaper have?

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Sig Seidenman, Owings Mills

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