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Almond would be more of the same in Baltimore County

I read the letter to editor from Baltimore County Councilman Tom Quirk (“Brochin promises but won't be able to deliver new schools, parks,” June 16) with great interest. Mr. Quirk argued that Jim Brochin will be unable to keep the promises that he is making if elected Baltimore County Executive, and that Vicki Almond is the better candidate.

Based on my experience as Mr. Quirk’s constituent, that tells me one thing: I better vote for someone other than Vicki Almond if I want to see the end of the culture of soft corruption in Baltimore County.

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In March 2017, I contacted Mr. Quirk when I found the now-notorious Executive Benefit Policy through a Public Information Act request. The policy had been enacted in secret and ultimately was terminated by former County Executive Kevin Kamenetz after a firestorm of criticism.

Mr. Quirk responded to me by email telling me that, under the separation of powers, “it would be inappropriate for the legislative branch to meddle in executive branch responsibility and duty.” I had 31 years of experience in local government law and knew that the duty and responsibility of the County Council was the exact opposite of what he told me.

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I soon learned that disinformation and dismissal of citizens’ concerns were standard operating procedures for the Democratic machine in Baltimore County that looks out for the interests of a select few politicians, bureaucrats and developers at the expense of ordinary citizens. Ms. Almond is the heir-apparent to the role of titular head of that machine.

If Ms. Almond is elected, the strings will be pulled by the developers and their lawyers who are funding her campaign. In other words, business as usual in Baltimore County.

In his letter, Mr. Quirk stated that there is no money to fulfill Mr. Brochin’s promises to build new schools and parks. This from a man who, with his cronies, found $43 million to bail out the developers of Towson Row.

Mr. Quirk’s letter touted his experience as a financial adviser, suggesting that you can take his advice to the bank. Instead, I take his advice, along with the campaign material that he sends to me, straight to the County trash and recycling facility in Halethorpe.

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David A. Plymyer, Catonsville

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