xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Leave carryout alcohol to the liquor stores | READER COMMENTARY

Alison Doyle Frary, a bartender at Killarney House in Davidsonville, sets up an alcohol to-go carrier with an Irish coffee, an Irish Mule and an Orange Crush earlier this year. January 27, 2021. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun).
Alison Doyle Frary, a bartender at Killarney House in Davidsonville, sets up an alcohol to-go carrier with an Irish coffee, an Irish Mule and an Orange Crush earlier this year. January 27, 2021. (Ulysses Muñoz/Baltimore Sun). (Ulysses Muñoz/The Baltimore Sun)

I’ve been reading over the past week or so about letting people carry alcohol out of a bar or restaurant. We have had carryout alcohol for decades from venues over most of the nation; they’re called liquor stores. I think we have enough access to alcohol as it is, without finding ways to put more alcohol on the streets (”Before Maryland makes carryout alcohol the norm, jurisdictions need more information about the potential impact,” June 30).

I could understand why it was done in the first place because of the pandemic, but now that everything is moving back toward normal, ever so slowly, we shouldn’t create more norms for the flood of alcohol that has been unleashed over the last decade or so upon our young people. How many young people that get a drink to go will get into their cars and not touch it until they get to their destination? Few, if any. Also, don’t forget their friends in the car with them. It’s still illegal for anyone to drink in a car while it’s being driven.

Advertisement

This seems like a bad idea to give them another easy way to veer from their possibly responsible journey through life with another law that they will not be punished for flouting until someone dies in an auto accident and they find an open, half-consumed carryout drink in the car.

Leave the alcohol in the liquor stores, where it is harder to buy without an ID, and the cocktails that the young people prefer in the restaurant or club they are in. Once alcohol goes out the door, there is no more oversight. From what I’ve seen, when it comes to alcohol, young people are finding it harder and harder to know when enough is enough.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Young people have a lot of ways to get their hands on alcohol, so let’s not make it easier for them to get into trouble, kill themselves or worse yet, kill someone else.

Jeff Rew, Columbia

Add your voice: Respond to this piece or other Sun content by submitting your own letter.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement