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In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019, file photo, travelers walk through a security checkpoint in Terminal 2 at Salt Lake City International Airport, in Salt Lake City. Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers, including American citizens, be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology.
In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019, file photo, travelers walk through a security checkpoint in Terminal 2 at Salt Lake City International Airport, in Salt Lake City. Federal officials are considering requiring that all travelers, including American citizens, be photographed as they enter or leave the country as part of an identification system using facial-recognition technology. (Rick Bowmer/AP)

Apparently, some people think it’s an invasion of privacy to have your face photographed by a machine at the airport (“DHS may require all travelers — including U.S. citizens — to be photographed as they enter or leave the country at airports,” Dec. 3).

Actually, I recently had a vacation in Australia and New Zealand. On the trip home, I entered the United States at Los Angeles International Airport. Part of the entry process was that I had the picture on my passport scanned and my face photographed for comparison.

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I found it reassuring. The process was quicker and less expensive than the previous method where I had to show my passport to a border control agent and answer a few questions. The lines moved more quickly and the screening was probably more accurate. The reason I was reassured is that the process makes it less likely that someone will steal my passport while I am out of the country in order to get into the United States using my passport.

Anyone at the airport can take my picture without my knowledge or consent so I see no problem with the government taking my picture to make sure that my passport and I are entering the country together.

Henry Farkas, Pikesville

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