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Investment in Park Heights is long overdue

From left: Maxine Mabry, Yvonne Donelson and Diane Russel, who live in the Park Heights community, look at drawings of proposed development in their community. This afternoon at the Langston Hughes Community Center, Baltimore Mayor Jack Young announced that the NHP Foundation and the Henson Development Company have been chosen to develop a 17-acre parcel in the Park Heights community.
From left: Maxine Mabry, Yvonne Donelson and Diane Russel, who live in the Park Heights community, look at drawings of proposed development in their community. This afternoon at the Langston Hughes Community Center, Baltimore Mayor Jack Young announced that the NHP Foundation and the Henson Development Company have been chosen to develop a 17-acre parcel in the Park Heights community.(Barbara Haddock Taylor / Baltimore Sun)

It’s exciting to finally see meaningful changes coming to the long-neglected neighborhoods of Park Heights (“Baltimore investing $100 million to ‘revitalize’ 17 acres of Park Heights; city presents NHP Foundation as developer,” Sept. 19). I just wish the pace of change could be much faster.

More than two decades ago, photographer Kristine Buls and I created a photo documentary project entitled “Park Heights: Lives Along an Avenue.” We interviewed a diverse range of folks who lived and worked along a 10-mile stretch of this road, from Park Circle to Caves Road — everyone from African-American pastors and Jamaican hairdressers to Jewish immigrants who had fled Russia. From then until now, very little has changed along Park Heights.

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I hope that this new wave of investments will finally empower the families and entrepreneurs who have called Park Heights home for a long time.

Amy Bernstein, Baltimore

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