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Scalia was an originalist when it came to the Constitution — and baseball

Justice Antonin Scalia was one of my 81 closest friends.

As an Orioles season ticket holder, I go to 81 home games with my friends. For over 20 years, I have gone to a game with the justice.

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We met at a Johns Hopkins event in 1993.

I asked the justice if I could go to the oral argument on Wisconsin's hate crimes law. I had sponsored a similar law. He said yes. I then asked if he had been to the recently opened Camden Yards. He had not.

Every year since, he came to a ballgame, and I went to an oral argument.

It didn't take many innings for him to realize that we did not agree on the Constitution or baseball. Not infrequently, I would tell him that I was working on legislation that would reverse a decision that he had written or supported. He is a Yankees fan.

He talked about the extraordinary response that his nomination brought about in the Italian-American community. He even got to meet Joe DiMaggio.

His original intent philosophy extended to baseball. He was not a fan of the designated hitter.

The beauty of the law is that people can disagree on principle, make their arguments, and respect the outcome.

Justice Scalia and I agreed on that.

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Del. Sandy Rosenberg, Baltimore

The writer, a Democrat, represents District 41 in the House of Delegates.

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