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No accountability in Freddie Gray's death?

I am trying to understand the situation with the Caesar Goodson acquittal ("Not guilty on all counts," June 24). There was no probable cause, but a black man is arrested for running. I have never been arrested for running. I guess it was the "neighborhood."

Then the prisoner is shackled and thrown on the floor of a police van. As a peace and justice activist, I have been handcuffed and placed on the floor of a police van. To say the least, I was in a dangerous and vulnerable position.

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We all have seen the images of an officer on top of the prisoner and how two of them had to drag him to the van. Angelique Herbert, a medic who treated the arrested at the Western District Baltimore Police Station was stunned to see that the prisoner was unconscious. But why should police be responsible for a prisoner in an obvious life-threatening situation? They are to arrest and transport. Based on the decisions reached at trial, the police have no responsibility to ensure that the prisoner is not injured. But, of course, a police officer can't tell if a prisoner needs medical assistance. There is no reason to err on the side of caution.

If the glove doesn't fit, you must acquit. So the prisoner is dead and the police can't be held responsible, as they did "all they could." So life or death on the streets of Baltimore goes on. The sun did come up Friday morning. However, if nothing is done about police misconduct in Baltimore, then we have another travesty of justice.

Max Obuszewski, Baltimore

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