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I commend Mayor Catherine Pugh on her leadership in vetoing the $15 minimum wage bill ("Some Pugh supporters say they feel betrayed by veto of $15 minimum wage bill," March 27). Although she acknowledges the fact that she did support increasing minimum wage as a candidate, she had no idea upon becoming the mayor that she was being faced with the Baltimore City Public Schools having a huge deficit and other unanticipated expenditures. She went to Annapolis to lobby Gov. Larry Hogan and the General Assembly for additional funds to assist the school system with this deficit. It would have been fiscally irresponsible on her part to then turn around and raise the minimum wage. You can't have it both ways. Mayor Pugh put her personal feelings aside and acted in her capacity as mayor to be fiscally responsible for Baltimore. She did the right thing. She will follow Maryland's lead on this issue.

I also commend Councilmen Isaac "Yitzy" Schleifer, Leon Pinkett and Eric Costello for voting against the minimum wage bill from the beginning. All three did research and made valid points as to why this bill was not in the best interest of Baltimore, especially since the surrounding counties were not doing the same. Councilman Ed Reisinger was also right in not voting to override the mayor's veto. Council President Bernard "Jack" Young should not be criticized for facing reality that there just is not enough votes for an override.

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This measure should be put to rest and the proponents should accept defeat. It was bad for Baltimore from its inception. The city simply cannot afford the cost. The new members of the City Council need to understand that while you made promises as a candidate, once you are elected you need to sometimes go against your promise. Baltimore is facing difficult times and you might need to cast your vote as to what is in the best interest and fiscally responsible for the city.

Again, I congratulate Mayor Pugh and am proud that I cast my vote for the right person to lead our city.

Susan Simon, Baltimore

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