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Anti-BDS bill is legally suspect

The effort in Annapolis to penalize Maryland businesses that boycott Israeli companies located in the occupied Palestinian territories is not the way I want elected officials spending their time. Their personal views about the Middle East conflict are irrelevant and belong at home, not in the state house ("Bill brings Middle East boycott conflict to Annapolis," Feb. 9).

The most compelling argument against this misguided piece of legislation is the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Citizens United that money equals speech. My shopping dollars speak my values and my beliefs. As long as Israel occupies the Palestinian territories, my dollars will not support Israeli businesses and products that benefit from this military occupation. Businesses in Maryland have that same right.

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The call from opponents of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions or BDS to penalize Maryland businesses is their viewpoint, which I respect, but there's a big difference between engaging in a debate about alternative viewpoints and the government using its lawmaking powers to penalize one viewpoint over another.

If this legislation passes and is signed into law, I'll speak with my dollars to support litigation to overturn it in court.

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Lora Lucero, Baltimore

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