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Congress has a right to makes its views known to Iran's leaders

Letter writer Lois Raimondi Munchel's contention that the 47 GOP senators who wrote to Iranian Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei informing him of the difference between an agreement and a treaty are guilty of treason is ludicrous ("Senators who sent note to Iran should be charged with treason," March 14).

First, the senators did not enter into negotiations, as claimed by the writer, but simply sent an informative letter. They were certainly not in violation of the cited 1799 Logan Act (need we go back to the 18th century?), which make it a crime for unauthorized citizens to negotiate with foreign governments.

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Moreover, who makes the decision that senators are not authorized to negotiate? If it is the president the law would give the nation's chief executive dictatorial rights to destroy any opposition to his policies.

I do not consider it disrespect for President Barack Obama or undercutting of the Iranian nuclear negotiations if the Senate chooses to exercise its prerogative of objecting to the terms of an agreement and defines as invalid any agreement not subject to Senate approval.

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Nelson Marans, Silver Spring

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