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Readers Respond

Clinton would be a great president

I trust Hillary Clinton. According to the polls, most people do not ("Clinton's deceptions are worse than Trump's," May 31). Given the decades-long drumbeat of Republican allegations of impropriety and the credulity the media often lends those allegations, perhaps I should not be surprised. But I am. For all the smoke, I have yet to see any real signs of fire.

During the mid-to late 1990s, Special Counsel Kenneth Starr and his staff tenaciously devoted several years and millions of taxpayer dollars in various Whitewater investigations but found no wrongdoing by Ms. Clinton. Similarly, the Senate's 13-month-long Whitewater hearings in the mid-1990s found no wrongdoing. The House's recent 11-hour grilling of Ms. Clinton on Benghazi turned up nothing damaging.

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As for the ruckus over the pending email issue, I, like Sen. Bernie Sanders, think it's much ado about very little. The decision to classify a message can be highly subjective. Although some email messages on the candidate's private account may contain information that, in hindsight, could have been classified, the fact is that the messages were not marked as classified. Absent a definitive finding by the FBI of a pattern that Ms. Clinton consciously originated messages that clearly should have been classified at a high level or that she invited staff or others to send her such messages without marking them as classified, the case should be closed. Although this email arrangement did not dot all the State Department i's — she's already admitted the arrangement was a mistake on her part — it was not illegal at the time, was consistent with the practices of prior secretaries and provides no basis for questioning her integrity.

For the foregoing reasons, and because of her long record of public service, I trust Hillary Clinton and enthusiastically support her candidacy. She has the foreign and domestic policy knowledge, savvy and toughness to make a great president.

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Allan Hubbard, Baltimore


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