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Readers Respond

Hogan believes in the divine right of highways

It took me several days to recover from reading about the answers Transportation Secretary Peter Rahn had for legislators questioning where the money went that was saved by canceling all funding for the Red Line ("Rahn says no new money for Baltimore transit," July 21). Several observations are in order:

First it is remarkable the ease and lack of transparency in which all of these saved funds have already been spent to gold plate the highways of rural Maryland. No Augean labors, matching funds, community meetings or environmental impact statements are required while it took a decade to plan an extension to the light rail. The Hogan administration believes in the Divine Right of Highways.

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Mr. Rahn was also strikingly unimpressive when touting a mishap that could occur when building a tunnel for the Red Line under Baltimore City. Dude, there are already five tunnels that have built for the Potomac tunnel for freight trains, Amtrak, the Metro, the Harbor Tunnel and I-95. Since these were built a Chunnel was built underneath the ocean between England and France. None of these have experienced any mishap. To suggest that the technology isn't there for a light rail tunnel is ludicrous.

We are also told that Mr. Rahn envisions cost effective solutions to Baltimore's public transit. My question is cost effectiveness for whom? Certainly not for transit riders.

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Paul R Schlitz Jr., Baltimore


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