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U.S. must insist on a better deal

Rabbi Floyd Herman's claim that the proposed deal with Iran "effectively blocks Iran's every path to attaining nuclear weapons" assumes that Iran will comply with its obligations under the agreement and that any failure to do so will be detected and punished ("The Iran nuclear agreement will make America and Israel safer," Sept. 1). Given Iran's long and sordid history of lying to inspectors and violating international agreements, and America's recent record of intelligence failures, both assumptions lack credence.

But even if these assumptions prove correct, the deal will not "enhance the security of the United States, Israel and the world" as asserted by Rabbi Herman for one simple reason: It leaves Iran's nuclear infrastructure intact, allowing Iran to obtain a nuclear weapon in 10 to 15 years when the restrictions imposed by the agreement expire. Thus, the best case scenario of full Iranian compliance and comprehensive U.S. inspections merely postpones but does not prevent the worst case scenario of a nuclear Iran.

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While Rabbi Herman is correct that a diplomatic resolution of the Iranian threat is optimum, no deal is better than one which releases billions of dollars to an expansionist, tyrannical, terrorist regime in exchange for promises to delay rather than dismantle its nuclear weapons program. To avoid this catastrophic outcome, Congress should reject the deal and insist that the Obama administration exercise the leadership and resolve necessary to negotiate a better deal.

Jay Bernstein, Baltimore

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