xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

How we treat the most vulnerable among us says a lot about who we are

A recent article about the lack of discernment and questionable ethics among those who own and manage foster youth group homes once again points up the treatment accorded the most vulnerable among us ("Troubles hit Maryland group home for disabled children," Oct. 18).

My own involvement in this area is working to root out nursing home abuse, and for me Winston Churchill's dictum is relevant here: "The mark of a society is how it treats its weakest members."

Advertisement

Last weekend I went to the Eastern Shore to soothe my workday nerves by meandering through multi-hued woods and feeling the lull of tidal water. Other ecological types with their kayaks were nearby. But soon I ran into hunters, armed with guns and bows and arrows, out for the kill. They sat in a lunch spot staring at a TV that instructed them to aim, shoot and kill.

On the trail, I heard a loud squawking. I though perhaps an intruder was nearby. When I got to the road I saw there had been a fresh kill, maybe a possum, and six red-headed vultures were devouring it for dinner.

Advertisement
Advertisement

Perhaps this is it: Survival of the fittest and those who arm themselves are strongest. Or maybe there are enough of us to remake a society where everyone's basic need for respect and humane treatment gets met.

Is there a candidate out there who can engineer this turnaround?

Joyce Wolpert, Baltimore

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement