xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Port Covington a 'boondoggle'

Baltimore City Councilman Ryan Dorsey is under fire for saying Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank's development plans amount to "white supremacy." (Baltimore Sun video)

Mayor Catherine Pugh and members of the City Council should not be "shocked" or "saddened" by Councilman Ryan Dorsey's observations concerning the Port Covington boondoggle ("Baltimore City Councilman under fire for attacks on Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank," Feb. 3). I agree that it is always more constructive to challenge the proposed plan and not injure Kevin Plank in any way. It is a free country, they say, and if Mr. Plank wants to construct "Dubai on the Chesapeake," he is free to follow his dream. But only with his money at risk.

Public money should not be in play here. After all, Mr. Plank is the among the 550 wealthiest humans on the planet, and he should be responsible for all the costs. He should use his own wealth and seek his own loans. PILOT and TIF deals are too loose, too futuristic with regard to all repayments. Thirty-five years on and the people who negotiated the deal will be long gone. Who will guarantee that all the promises were fulfilled?

Advertisement

Who will make sure that Port Covington will not become another segregated, gated, white enclave? Who will be left holding the bag? If Port Covington is such a great need and idea, Mr. Plank should have no trouble getting funding from the private sector. Public money should always benefit the common good, primarily the needs of those who lack the necessities of life — food, clothing, education, health care and living wages.

Brendan Walsh, Baltimore

Advertisement

The writer is co-founder of Viva House.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement